Allison K. Lange Lecture: The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Photographs

November 7 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

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Since the nation’s founding, Americans have used images to define political power and gender roles. Popular pictures praised male political leaders, while cartoons mocked women who sought rights. In the mid-nineteenth century, women’s rights activists like Sojourner Truth and Susan B. Anthony challenged these powerful norms by distributing engraved and photographic portraits that represented women as political leaders. Over time, suffragists developed a national visual campaign to win voting rights. Their photographs captured their public protests and demonstrated their dedication to their cause for mass audiences. Allison Lange’s talk is based on her book, Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement, published in May 2020 by the University of Chicago Press. The book focuses on the ways that women’s rights activists and their opponents used images to define gender and power during the suffrage movement.

Presented in partnership with the Michigan Photographic Historical Society

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Date

Nov 07 2020

Time

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Location

Online

Organizer

The William L Clements Library, University of Michigan